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Thread: Undersink water damage

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    momdidit is offline New Member
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    Undersink water damage

    I have water damage under my kitchen sink from a slow leak and I need to repair the wood damage myself. The house was built in the 1970s and is not like the module construction you find in new houses today. Has anybody got tips on how to fix this or a source book I can get from the library? Thanks

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    Total Home Care is offline New Member
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    only advice i can give is you must first find out how much water damage has been done by taking out a small section of the bottom of the sink base on the inside under sink.....but if their is floor damage under the sink base you will need to take out the complete unit and repair floor as needed.
    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''with the limited info you posted i am only speculating that the base is rotted from the water damage....only then should you consider cutting out a small section of the floor base of cabinet to inspect the actall floor under and that is only if you cannot view this from a basement or craw space......;;'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

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    HayZee518 is offline Deity
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    First of all is the water leak fixed?
    Upon removing the cabinet bottom, what color is the floor? Gray or green or black? If it is osb does the wood look like it expanded? Does it readily give way under pressure - press on it with your thumb and see.
    If it feels "punky" then you'll probably have to replace it. If it seems solid then try an application of "PENETROL" sealant. This is a solvent based oil which is supposed to rejuvinate dry rotted wood.

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    pushkins is offline General Contractor
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    If the water leak is now repaired and the damaged is localized to be mainly inside the sink base cabinet then repair the cabinet base (by adding a 1/4" or 1/2" shelf). As long as the leak is fixed and the damage is not structual then removing the cabinet to repair OSB or other sub flooring seams a little drastic considering the fact that it is under the cabinet.

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    rk_king2004 is offline New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by momdidit
    I have water damage under my kitchen sink from a slow leak and I need to repair the wood damage myself. The house was built in the 1970s and is not like the module construction you find in new houses today. Has anybody got tips on how to fix this or a source book I can get from the library? Thanks
    The very first thing you need to do is to fix the leak, then tackle the rotted area.

    If the entire bottom is water damage, cut it out by cutting a straight line down the middle, with a skill saw, or a jig saw...http://www.alhomerepairsyourself.com

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    honlude is offline New Member
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    Be real sensitive of the soaked and rotted area because that can lead to mold. Mold can cause serious health issues. Possibly seek a reputable company to do free mold inspection after you're done. Good luck.

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    paulee is offline New Member
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    Protect your cabinets from water damage

    Regarding UNDER SINK PLUMBING LEAKS - I found this product after i had a bad leak that pretty much destroyed my cabinet and underlying floor - plus i got some pretty ugly mold stuff growing too- anyway, this company makes a pan that covers the entire bottom of the cabinet and protects it from water leaking. It's called Driptite Sink & Vanity Base Protectors. I bought one online and love it. just wish i would ahve had it BEFORE i had the problem. I got it at driptite.com

    good luck

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    skyruler87 is offline New Member
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    Water damaged the cabinet under the kitchen sink

    Hello guys,
    I had a leak in my kitchen faucet. I did not take it seriously but now I just found out the extent of the damage and dont know what to do. Here is what happened. The faucet leaked and the water went between the back of the faucet and the wall and damaged the laminate countertop and the wood to which it was glued on. Then after the wood absorbed all that water, the water apparently started dripping under the counter and the cabinet underneath the faucet got damaged. The peice of wood that goes behind the cabinet along the wall is all swollen and spongy and the base of the cabinet caved down after it weakend and got rotten due to the weight of the utensils lying on top of it. so now I dont know how to repair it and if I will be able to find the exact same material to replace everything that has damaged. I was thinking to cut the damaged part out and get the replacement material from home depot and nail/glue it back.

    I video taped the kitchen cabinet and uploaded it to youtube. Here is the link: (sorry cant post a link since this is my first post here but you can replace the word 'dot' with '.' and remove all the spaces in between and then open the link) :w w w dot y o u t u b e dot c o m /watch?v=z2YnKNu-Lm4

    Please let me know if you guys can give me some advice. If possible provide me with the 'how to do' video link or a write up with lots of pictures and most importantly an estimate of how much will the repair cost me.

    Thank you everyone,
    Skyruler87

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    Kitchen sink.

    A mess for sure, but not that big of a deal.
    * First, turn that faucet to one side to locate the model number stamped on the back. It looks like a Moen faucet. Give them a call and explain about the faucet leaking, and that you have the part number. They will send a free replacement.
    * While that's in the mail, tackle this sink cabinet. You will have to replace it, as it is rotted beyond repair. Shut the faucets off, remove the connections, remove the drain pipes, then remove the sink itself. There are several screw tabs located along the underside perimeter. Remove them and lift the sink clear of the counter top.
    * Remove the sink cabinet. Reclaim the doors the doors and false drawer fronts. You may need them later if new doors do not match shape/style. It appears the kitchen cabinets are of an oak and, color and shade-wise, not difficult to match. May end up just having to change out the doors and false drawer fronts.
    * That wall looks to be drywall that was soaked. Remove all the wall that was ruined. Get a sheet of same thickness drywall and fit it over the plumbing. Make sure that the inside of the wall and floor are nice a dry, first. A fan left blowing on the area over night will usually take care of any issues there.
    * As for the counter top....a bit more of a challenge, but not impossible. Purchase a new top at any box store. As for the hole....a piece of cake, really. Use the old cabinet as something to go by. Measure from one end to show where the edge of the sink should go. Then measure the width of the old hole and again, make a mark for that. Lay sink upside down on counter top, centering over those two lines, and pencil it's outline. You will see there is an offset between the outline and those two lines you earlier marked. Keep that spacing and mimic it all around the outline. The new, smaller, outline is the hole for the sink cutout. Drill a 3/8 hole anywhere on that inside line. (Don't make the mistake of using the outside line!) Get your saber saw out and follow that line around. Be careful to hold the far end of the cutout from the saw when nearing completion of the cut so it doesn't drop and bind the saw. It will take a bit of sawing, so be prepared for patience.
    * Dry fit the cabinet, counter top and sink, making sure all is good.
    * If satisfied with it all, secure the cabinet base to the wall by screwing through that backboard piece near the top to a couple of wall studs. Set the counter top in pace and secure that with the screws that were originally used to secure the old top to the cabinets. Those screws are usually secured from under the inside of the cabinets. Pull out a drawer and use a flashlight to locate the screws. Sometimes through corner braces, sometimes through the front piece and driven at an angle to the bottom of the counter top.
    * Using some plumber's putty (the kind that does not stain...) place a wad on the counter and use your palm to roll out a long, narrow bead. A long 3/8"noodle is about what you're looking for. Place this just inside the penciled outline. Set the sink tub in place and gently press down all around. Be careful to not move it. Used the hardware that held the tub to the old counter and secure it to the new from the underside. Take turns on all the hold down screws. Don't over tighten one. Gently snug each one in turn until all are firm. Do not remove any putty that has squished just yet. Let it set and cure a bit.
    * Connect up the drain and supply lines. Do not turn on water just yet.
    * By now the replacement kit sho0uld have arrived. Usually takes about 5 business days.
    Follow the directions for replacement of parts. If any questions, call that hot line included and they'll help you through the rebuild. Verify that the faucet moves comfortably left/right and the handle moves comfortably up and down. If all is well, then turn on one supply line and operate the faucet and check for leaks. If that's good, the turn on the other supply line and verify that.
    * If all that went well, (no doubt you did a great job so far!!), then it's time to replace the front doors and drawer fronts i needed.

    I hope that helps. Let us know how you fair....

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    HayZee518's Avatar
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    why are we answering a posting that's 4 plus years old?

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