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Thread: Pole Barn Header Board Structural Load Question

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    driz is offline Handyman
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    Pole Barn Header Board Structural Load Question

    I'm going to be starting a pole barn equipment shed shortly in Northern NY. I had planned to support it by 2x6 PT poles spaced 12' all around. Talking to the lumberyard planner he said the only way to do that spacing would be to use an engineered header on both sides of the poles. That is WAY to expensive for my taste. I was going to use a 2x10 or 2x12 and possibly support it by lambeaming it with plywood on both sides but not the expensive certified stuff for a simple 24 x 48' barn. I had planned on using standard trusses 5/12 across the width span of 24'. The width I want for both simplicity and usefulness with putting wide things in and out. What are the alternatives to the fancy high priced stuff??????

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    pushkins is offline General Contractor
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    Firstly I'm confused by a 2 x 6 pole ?
    12' is a fairly wide span in northern NY with snow loads as well, so that's probably why the lumber yard suggested laminated beams, I'm not so sure 2x12' doubled wouldn't work just as well, and adding 1/2" ply between them would also add tremendous strength.

    Can you clarify the 2x6 pole part, then it might make it a little easier.
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    driz is offline Handyman
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    Quote Originally Posted by pushkins View Post
    Firstly I'm confused by a 2 x 6 pole ?
    12' is a fairly wide span in northern NY with snow loads as well, so that's probably why the lumber yard suggested laminated beams, I'm not so sure 2x12' doubled wouldn't work just as well, and adding 1/2" ply between them would also add tremendous strength.

    Can you clarify the 2x6 pole part, then it might make it a little easier.
    Yup I meant 6 X 6. By 2 x 12 doubled I am assuming putting them both together on the outside of the post with the ply sandwiched in between right? I like the 12' opening for backing big stuff in there. I can live with 10 however as it's enough if it is going to save a lot of time and heart ache. All I have to do is redrill the holes which isn't fun but easy enough with the old Ferguson tractor I have and post hole digger and I'll get 2 more feet out of it and make it 50' long. So what would the it take for 10' spacing, 2 each 2x10's all around?
    Last edited by driz; 07-05-2013 at 05:30 PM.

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    pushkins is offline General Contractor
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    Yes you could do it that way, remember though2x 2 x + 1/2" ply will make the total cut out on the pole 3 1/2". The entire beam will need to sit on the post, no outward overhang.
    The laminated 2x12' (with ply) will make the strongest beam (other than laminated LVL) as long as you glue and screw it.
    At 10' you could use doubles 2 x 10's Probably still be advantageous to laminate in a 1/2" ply.
    Last edited by pushkins; 07-05-2013 at 05:38 PM.
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    spans

    If it would help the situation, I worked on a property in Lake Placid which used engineered trusses spanning a 24 ft wide garage space. these were spaced 18 on center. the lower web is free to move, the upper web rests on the outside beams. In this case 4X8 inch steel I beams from post to post, again 4 inch poles with welded brackets for the beams.
    wooden is definately cheaper but the loading between posts drops considerably. an engineered truss consists of a top web, a bottom web and two osb or mdf center webs glued into rabbetted chanels in both top and bottom webs.

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