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Thread: Electric motor parts.

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    Electric motor parts.

    Not sure to post this here or in the electrical. Please move if you need to.

    I have two motors that need some attention. The first is from a Craftsman air compressor. It's a Gould Century Motor. Part 8-15, motor 8143-20, frame L56Y, code M, type CS, serial BA7, cust. part no. M06026. I need a wiring diagram for it. I removed it from the compressor for some work, wrote down where all the wires go...except for one.
    The second is a motor from a Montgomery Wards Power Kraft, Tri Power Radial Shop (radial arm saw). Model tPC2296A. Serial 58K, motor no. 20-67, 115v 13.0 amps, 2hp max developed. I need brushes and springs for it. Where can I dig them up?

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    HayZee518's Avatar
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    for brushes and springs try EURTON ELECTRIC. Lemme do some research on the Gould motor. Is the motor three phase or single, 240 or 120 volt.

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    I need some extra info. horsepower/ rpm? voltage 120/240? - single or three phase? I found a gould/century motor with a J56 frame - the Y designation indicates a special mounting. 56 is a standard mounting - there is no L designation on a frame number.

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    Electric motors...

    Both motors are on 110 and single phase. The Gould can be run on 220 and is a one horse that runs at 3450 rpm.

    Thanks, HayZee.

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    try this motor connection.
    for 120 volt
    1-3 to L1, 4 to L2, 2-7 together and taped
    240 volt
    1 to L1
    4 to L3
    3-2 together and taped
    7 no connection - tape up

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    what follows is a gould century motor mounted on an air compressor. the instruction is for converting a 240 volt connection to a 120 volt connection.
    First, check the specification plate for the voltage rating. If it says 110/220V then you *can* change the voltage on the motor. If it only says 220V, then you can *not* practically change the voltage on the motor. There are how-tos on how to convert motors and how to run dedicated 240V lines for power tools on this site, which you should check first. However, here is a brief description of how to change the voltage on the motor you describe:

    1. *FIRST* FOLLOW ALL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS. Make sure that the power is disconnected, that all rotating components have stopped, etc. *YOU* ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY.
    2. Remove the cover plate on the back of the motor. The back of the motor is the side opposite to the side with the rotating shaft sticking out.
    3. Change the input voltage to the motor. Note that standard 240V AC power consists of two "hot" leads of opposite phase, whereas standard 120V AC power consists of one "hot" lead and one neutral lead. Also, both of these power connections may or may not have a third lead which is ground.
    4. On the circuit board (visible after the cover plate has been removed) there are terminals marked with numerals "1" through "6". Remove the 240V wire altogether by disconnecting it from terminal "6" and terminal "1", plus ground wire if installed.
    5. Find the electrical connection on the circuit board with the brown wire. For a 240V installation, the brown lead will be connected to the terminal marked "3". For a 120V installation the brown lead will be connected to terminal "5".
    6. Switch the brown lead from terminal "3" to terminal "5". This converts the Gould Century electric motor to 120V.
    7. Connect a new 120V wire to terminals "1" and "6". Note that the "hot" lead of the 120V wire should be connected to terminal "1", and the neutral lead should be connected to terminal "6". Hook up the ground lead in the same location as it was disconnected from.
    8. Replace the cover plate removed in step 1.

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    Gould motor

    As luck would have it, a neighbor has an almost identical compressor from Sears with a 1 hp Gould 110/220 motor on it. At first I was elated to find his has a wiring diagram on it. And it showed what to do for the 110 hookup. Elated 'till I read this last post. There is a difference in how it says it should be hooked up. So, I hook it up with one of these methods. When I plug it in to the 110 outlet and turn the switch on, will harm come to the motor if it's incorrectly wired for 22 instead? Other words, it will ONLY be used on 110. Will momentarily feeding a motor set up for 220 with 110 let any of that all important smoke out? If it does not immediately turn, I shut it off. Then swap wires to the 'other' way and try again. Any harm coming to it?

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    AGould Motor wiring

    It's done! It works!! The only diff was connecting the neutral to #4 rather than #6. It did not turn at all when on #6. The brown wire, which was the one that originally had n0o home, was shown to go to #5.
    Thank you so much, HayZee, for your help. It's very generous of you to always share your expertise.

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    Motor brushes...

    Got a call back today from my e-mail to Eurton Electric. New brushes and caps are on the way. Great people that are easy to work with.
    Thanks again, HayZee, for your help.

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