Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Adhesive Vynl Flooring Tiles

  1. #1
    DKAudio is offline Journeyman
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    447
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Adhesive Vinyl Flooring Tiles - Floor Leveling

    I got some adhesive backing vinyl (or lynoleum) 1 sq. ft tiles. I wanted to install them in my downstairs bathroom. I pulled up the carpet that was there and removed the padding with a wire brush. The bathroom plumbing must not have been there before because I found a huge cement patch job for the waste lines. It goes right down the middle of the bathroom and is probably 1/8" higher than the rest. The rest of the concrete is perfectly smooth and painted. I tried taking an angle grinder to the patch job to make it smooth with the rest of the floor but it did not work how I had hoped. I then got some Patch, Underlayment & Embossing Leveler (guy at Menards said it would work). I have never worked with the stuff before and there aren't even any directions on how to mix it, etc. I also don't know if it is self leveling. I am very confused at what I am supposed to do, I have never done floor repairs before. I am going to pull of all the trim and but a blocker piece of wood on the door but that is pretty much all I know how to do. Also, if any of you have any links to install the adhesive back tiles that would be great, I have never done those either. Thanks
    Last edited by DKAudio; 05-09-2006 at 12:45 PM.

  2. #2
    pushkins's Avatar
    pushkins is offline General Contractor
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,843
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 158 Times in 149 Posts
    You can buy from big stores floor leveller that is self levelling, I'm not sure what exactly you have already bought, but it sounds like it is a self levelling product.
    Make sure your subfloor is screwed down tight and that there is no movement in it before you start.

    You want to mix it up to a runny mixture about the consistancy of fondue chocolate, it MUST be mixed well and without lumps, so this usually requires a mixing tool attached to a drill for the quickest and easiest method.

    Pour it onto the floor on either side of the raised section you spoke about and it will find a common level, you can help it out with a trowel if you feel the need.

    As for laying the self stick tiles, first make sure you apply a "primer" to the floor it's available at any hardware store, it's usually white and a few bucks a bottle. To lay the tile first work out where all your lines will be and try to determine how the tiles will sit and what way looks best, lay out some of the tiles on the floor to get a better idea, once you have done that mark two sides of a central tile and useing a straight edge mark the two lines so that they are crossing over each other at 90 degrees, this will give you a place to start your first tile at the intersection of both lines.
    The laying of the tiles is the easy part, once you lay the first one then the rest fall into place.

  3. #3
    DKAudio is offline Journeyman
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    447
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I was planning on my subfloor being just the concrete, is this ok? Is primer still needed with concrete? I was told it wasen't and the tiles will go right over concrete. Thanks

  4. #4
    pushkins's Avatar
    pushkins is offline General Contractor
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,843
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 158 Times in 149 Posts
    Concrete and especially new concrete or floor leveler should be "primed" as well. Priming basically helps with the porosity of the surface and it's ability to dry out the adhesive before it's had time to bond to the surface.

  5. #5
    DKAudio is offline Journeyman
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    447
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I finally got a chance to level the floor. It was a disaster. I spent $25 on 1 gallon at Home Depot. Stuff called TP Level Plus
    http://tplevelplus.com/
    He said it was the best for what I was trying to do. The stuff is super sandy and didn't level on its own at all. Some parts look ok but others have tons of bumps now, I still don't even think the floor is level. I don't know what to do now, I am so frustrated. Can I sand this down smooth some how? I have a Makita square palm sander.

    Thanks

  6. #6
    DKAudio is offline Journeyman
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    447
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Anyone have any ideas?

  7. #7
    pushkins's Avatar
    pushkins is offline General Contractor
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,843
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 158 Times in 149 Posts
    Unfortunately sometimes the people that work in departments at large hardware stores should NOT give advice.
    The floor leveler I was referring to is in a bag it's a powder (like flour) and you add water and mix yourself to the runny consistency I previously spoke of.

    I'm not sure what you can do with the situation you have now, if it were me I'd be trying ASAP to remove any severely high areas with a masonry chisel and a hammer to at least knock off the tops of any "bumps".

    You are then going to have to determine how bad the floor is out of level and if or not you have made it worse than what it was.

    Again go back to my previous post about the floor leveler in a bag,(it is approx. $25 for a 25 pound bag) mix it as per the instructions and apply it to the floor as per the instructions it should pour on like a thicker cream, it will find it's own level. (You can help it with a trowel BUT don't overwork the mix it will start to set quickly). The idea is to let gravity work on the mix so remember the mix MUST be watery as per the instructions.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    .
    Posts
    1,509
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 26 Times in 25 Posts

    Floor sander...

    I wonder if the local rent-all shop wuld have something you could use. There may be a concrete grinder that uses water and amkes a slurry. Looks like a floor polisher. Don't know what kind of pad is used, but did see it used in a commercial building applicaton for terazzo floor. After set-up that floor wsa dull and bumpy. After the polishing the stones were flat and all was ground smooth as silk.t.

  9. #9
    DKAudio is offline Journeyman
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    447
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Ok, I took off the high spots and am applying some more leveler over some areas. It is starting to look ok. There are a few spots that could use some sanding though. Can I use normal Aluminum Oxide sandpaper for concrete? What grit? I would try an angle grinder with a masonry disc but that is too fast and inaccurate. Should I use this...
    http://www.depot-tile.com/product/basement.html
    I have been doing some reading and found that on bare concrete something should be used and that Basement Proofer will be great. Hopefully it is not too pricey.

    My last question...
    Outside of the bathroom is the laundry room and a chunk of old green carpet (maybe 10X10) that I would like to replace with the same tile. The concrete out there should be pretty smooth but it is painted brown. I have read that putting those self adhesive vinyl tiles over painted concrete should work fine and they should stick really well. Is this true or do I need to do something with that too? Thanks

  10. #10
    pushkins's Avatar
    pushkins is offline General Contractor
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,843
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 158 Times in 149 Posts
    Sandpaper will not do the job you are wanting it to do. Well okay it might over time but the cost of how much paper you would use would far outweigh the benefits and time involved to complete the task.

    As it is a smallish area I think renting a commercial concrete sander would be both expensive and unpractical, I would head down the path of an angle grinder and masonry disk to remove any high points.
    You now have the correct floor leveler I take it , so any errors you make are very easily repaired. Make sure you have a 4' level with you, keep checking the level and remarking the floor for high points.

    You need to be very careful in regards to putting adhesive tile over painted concrete, it will work and work well ONLY if the paint is firm to the concrete floor. The bond between the tile and concrete is only as good as the hold that the adhesive can get on the floor. If the paint is not flaking and is firm to the floor then you should be right. Either way make sure you remove any flaking paint with a wire brush before applying the tiles.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •