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  1. #1
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    Sand Bees Taking Over My Side Yard

    I've never seen these things before but they have completely taken over my side yard...

    From what i have read they are called sand wasps/bees/flys etc

    They look like grey sweatbees and are digging a thousand small holes in my yard.

    I have no problem with them aerating my side yard for me, but the sheer number of them are the concern. I know that they eat smaller insects which isn't bad but the fact that the females that live in the ground do sting and that they have gotten my dog a few times is the reason they need to go.

    There are literally thousands of these things flying 6 inches above my yard starting from sunup until maybe 5 o clock in the afternoon before they begin to discipate.

    I read online that Diamatecous Earth (sp?) will get rid of them, however it does take some time and its organic so it will not harm my lawn, plants, pets, or myself.

    I have covered my yard twice in this stuff and also put it into their holes only to come out the next day and see that they have just dug new holes.

    Its been 4 days since my first dusting and i cant find any information on how long DE may take to work.

    Anybody else have any experience with these? or have any ideas to get rid of them shy of calling an exterminator?

  2. #2
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    Diatomaceous Earth is a microscopic form of pulverized sea creatures skeleton. It is all natural. It forms a filtering medium called "flock" when used with swimming pool filters. For bees and other insects it is an irritant. when ingested it is like many sharp shards that cause the insect to bleed internally and so kills it.

  3. #3
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    we used to use it growing up as a chemical for our pool and i remember it being used in our yard for pest control and completely forgot about it until these bees popped up and i google it.

    I just bought the house last july so this is my first spring here and have never encountered these bees before.

    Any idea how long it will take to get these bees out of my yard? They have taken refuge in my yard near several hyacinths, daffodils and some tulips which have yet to bloom which is why i believe they have chosen this part of my yard.

    Should i maybe dust these flowers with it as well? i don't want to ruin any opportunity for the flowers to be pollinated and come back next year but i do want these bees out.

    Also by dust, i mean it looks like a bad cocaine deal went down. This stuff is definetly visible and i have also put it down their holes as well.
    Last edited by Tcanuth; 03-20-2012 at 05:53 PM.

  4. #4
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    Locate the entrance to the hive. When the sun begins to set, watch for the bees to return and focus on the area of greatest bee activity. Do not get too close and or approach the hive wearing yellow clothing or while carrying a sugar-laden drink. If a bee flies near you, or even if it stings you, back away and head for home, moving in a zig-zag pattern.

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    3

    Go back to the entrance at night, when all the bees have returned to the hive. Cover your flashlight with a red disk to diffuse the light. And bring a plastic bucket, three or four bricks, a protective face mask and a large can of extra strength Raid spray.
    4

    Stop approximately 10 feet from the entrance and set the bucket down. Cover your face with a mask and spray the sides of the bucket with Raid. Spray until the sides are well coated and there is a reasonable quantity of insecticide pooling in the bottom.
    5

    Pick up the bucket and approach the opening to the nest. Invert the bucket over the opening and place the bricks on top.
    6

    Leave the bucket over the nest for 2 to 4 days, or until the buzzing stops.

    Read more: How to Kill Sand Bees | eHow.com How to Kill Sand Bees | eHow.com

  5. #5
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    I dont have nearly enough bricks or buckets for this lol.

    I am talking about 1000 separate holes. 1 for each wasp.

    I think the difference is is that these are actually sand wasps, not bees...i would post a link but i need a few more posts before i can do that.

    They apparently just like to build their nests in sandyish soil and tend to congregate because of the conditions, not because they are social, which they are not.

    These holes are spread across approximately 50x25 area of my house that is commonly travelled.

    I did notice 2 other options... 1 said to use a mixture of dish soap and water. This coats the wasps not allowing them to fly and i guess suffocates them.

    2nd said to put old carpet over the area and weigh it down. The bees are either unable to get home or get to their nests so they will leave if they can or die.

    Anyone heard of these options and do they work?
    Last edited by Tcanuth; 03-20-2012 at 08:20 PM.

  6. #6
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    I have a similar issue except mine are cicada killers. they look like HUGE bees, while they are pretty docile it gets pretty annoying when about 30 are flying around the back yard at once... i took a tennis racket and went to town.. Only issue is more seem to come back.. not sure what else to do. I heard they are attracted to loose/disturbed dirt and we just put a new fence in. Hopefully this year wont be bad.

  7. #7
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    bees

    I just copied what is on a site to get rid of those bees. But with the quantity of bees necessary to pollinate fruit trees and vegetables dwindling -maybe- you ought to just live with them.
    Anyway here's what I copied:


    Locate the entrance to the hive. When the sun begins to set, watch for the bees to return and focus on the area of greatest bee activity. Do not get too close and or approach the hive wearing yellow clothing or while carrying a sugar-laden drink. If a bee flies near you, or even if it stings you, back away and head for home, moving in a zig-zag pattern.
    3

    Go back to the entrance at night, when all the bees have returned to the hive. Cover your flashlight with a red disk to diffuse the light. And bring a plastic bucket, three or four bricks, a protective face mask and a large can of extra strength Raid spray.
    4

    Stop approximately 10 feet from the entrance and set the bucket down. Cover your face with a mask and spray the sides of the bucket with Raid. Spray until the sides are well coated and there is a reasonable quantity of insecticide pooling in the bottom.
    5

    Pick up the bucket and approach the opening to the nest. Invert the bucket over the opening and place the bricks on top.
    6

    Leave the bucket over the nest for 2 to 4 days, or until the buzzing stops.
    7

    For a chemical-free alternative, approach the hive at night, as above, and place three folded black, waterproof tarps over the hive entrance. Use patio stones to secure the tarps, covering the entire surface area and leave the tarps in place for at least a week.

    Read more: How to Kill Sand Bees | eHow.com How to Kill Sand Bees | eHow.com

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