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  1. #1
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    Monitor 22 Heater

    Hi, I am glad I located this forum and it was kind of intimitading when all you found at first was AL's site. I am currently having an issue with my Monitor 22 heater. I utilize K-1 kerosene with the internal tank. The issue are If I let my heater sit for a while then proceed to start my heater up it will run for about 30 minutes then you will get the red flashing light for out of fuel then If you by-pass the low fuel indicator plug for use of the internal tank only then this also runs for about 30 minutes and shuts off with all blinking lights with no error code. Then if you attempt to restart the heater you will get the red flashing light for out of fuel. This all happens when the internal tank is full of fuel. I can hear the solenoid pumping as it makes a little click, click, click, also you can fill it pulsing to when it runs at first. The filter inside the bowl is clean, the fusible valve is wide open. The flame inside is blue when it runs. I am puzzled by what is causing what appears to be getting out of fuel symptoms.. any help or suggesting would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    fuel flow from the internal tank is gravity flow to the fuel sump. check for ANY blockage or kinks in the tank to sump fuel line. if the tank is vented check the vent to be clear. the click, click, click indicates a starved fuel pump. in the very bottom of the fuel pump is a stainless steel screen. use gumout carb cleaner to clean this and all screens. gumout will NOT destroy the plastic. items that cause you to get warning lights are: no fuel, no flame, shorted flamerod, system lockout condition. what causes system lockout are: too much fuel, not enough fuel, system overheat, faulty microprocessor. unfortunately there is no way a user can troubleshoot the microprocessor without specialized equipment. please go to the main forum and look for ILLUSTRATIONS. in here is a sub directory called monitor heater repairs ( forget the sub-directory) go to the sixth thread and download the monitor manual. here is a flowchart type of troubleshooting manual. pages near the end have blown up diagrams of the 22, 41, 422 heaters with spare parts lists.
    I don't see why Al Luce just doesn't remove his website. Its useless and doesn't accomplish anything just a bunch of hype. He was supposed to have an online video for monitors (which he constantly badmouths) although at one point that was all he could talk about as being the most efficient type of heater and made him a bundle. what bearing his cat has on the site is beyond me.
    Last edited by HayZee518; 12-25-2009 at 12:28 PM.

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    blameg (12-25-2009)

  4. #3
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    Thank you, It turned out to be the screen that filters the fuel through the internal tank. When I first examined it was cover with a brown sludge which only allowed the fuel to drip out, since cleaning it off with a Qtip it is running perfect again...

  5. #4
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    that brown sludge is common to k-1 dyed or non dyed. water is extracted from the fuel through condensation and the k-1 floats on top of the water. if you have similar problems down the line, remove the sump tank, remove the top cover and liberally spray gumout into the sump around the needle valve area. you may need a q-tip to clean in the corners, but this brown crap's got to come out. oh yeah never try to adjust that small black screw on the float. if you do you'll be sorry. that's for the fuel level for the sump tank.

  6. #5
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    I am helping a friend with his M22, which goes thru the startup cycle fine but then won't fire off. Igniter is new and heats up. Good fuel flow to the "carburetor" and the nylon inlet screen is clean. I disconnected the fuel line at the burner pot , put the end in a jar and started the cycle. When it came time for fuel I hear the pump start but after pumping a few bubbles it pumped nothing but air. Pump seems ok but not getting oil. I depressed the red button a few times, and tapped the carb several times hoping to loosen a stuck something or other. I would have taken the pump off but it seems very hard to get to the two hex head hold down screws. What is best, a 1/4 " drive ratchet? I really don't want to have to try to remove the whole assy as that looks even more inaccessible. Any ideas?
    Thanks in advance. Jim

  7. #6
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    there is probably gelled fuel in the sump tank or carberator as some people call it. difficult as it may seem, to clean out the tank it has to come out. the screen in the bottom has to be cleaned. there's a little hole inside the filter compartment that feeds up to the needle valve in the tank. the CLV or constant level valve is just a float with a rubber needle valve that operates off the fuel in the sump. m41 and m22 sump prime just manually opens the needle valve. it doesn't "pump" any fuel anywhere. the fuel solenoid pump has a stainless filter on the bottom of it. this also must be clean. don't take apart the pump - lots of small parts inside. 1/4 inch hex may be the correct size but I'll bet it is 7mm. while you are at it for reference the combustion blower uses 608Z ball bearings. these are a common bearing for inline skates. eBay has a sleeve of them for around 8 bucks. better than getting bearings from an mpi distributor. the cost from them will floor you!

  8. #7
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    HayZee- Thanks for the quick response. If I decide to tackle this I would be inclined to try to remove the pump only first, and check its stainless filter. If it seems OK I would remove the sump assy. It looks like I would need to remove the fusible link in back, then figure out how to get at the screws that hold the sump to the floor. Once those are out, it looks like the sump should come out the front easily once unscrewed. Does this sound like the right sequence?
    Really appreciate the help, won't bug you further after this. Jim

  9. #8
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    Naww don't worry about bugging me. Before I started putting threads in here about monitor heaters, I was just like you pulling out hairs!
    The fuel path to the monitor is from the external tank to a fusible link [valve] with a rising stem. Through a filter to your feed line. Then at the heater rear is another fusible link [valve]. Turn the knurled knob counter clockwise to allow the stem to go back inside the valve. With the monitor grill off, look in back of or on the side of the sump tank. Unscrew the brass fitting. Pull off the two spade terminals off the pump. Unscrew the gland nut on top of the pump and pull the cappilary out. Unscrew the two screws that hold the pump to the top plate and pull the pump body out. Unscrew the two screws that hold the top plate to the sump body. Remove the plate. Now the sump body is fastened to a bracket which in turn is fastened by four screws to the heater bottom. Remove these four screws and remove the whole sump. Now, use GUMOUT carb cleaner and clean out the sump tank especially near the stamped steel mechanism on the left side. Blow out with compressed air. Clean the pump screen with gumout and shake dry. Then put everything back together in reverse order.

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    toomedic (12-13-2011)

  11. #9
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    Thanks

    Thanks Hayzee...
    Great Information. This heater is great, once that ticking noise started I swear I could hear it haunting me in my sleep. I took my sump and pump all apart, found that the little filter that I could have accessed from the side without taking it apart was the dirty little culprit. Once cleaned, the heater is back to new!

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