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Thread: Will peel stop keep all paint from peeling?

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    ba_50 is offline Handyman
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    Will peel stop keep all paint from peeling?

    Hi,

    I have a 100 year old house that due to moisture, earthquakes and whatever, that has been peeling paint for two years. Last year I used peel stop on the damaged ares and helped there. Yet a crack still pops up and needs to be scraped. Will peel stop used as a primer for both rooms soak in to all the paint and glue it down? Thanks.

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    pushkins is offline General Contractor
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    The simple answer would be "no". For the most the stuff works but (and it is a big but) there will always be areas that cannot be helped without complete removal of old paint.
    Even with the use of any of the peel stop products if the paint is not, or cannot adhere to the surface then no matter what you do it's not going to work.
    Basically the product works as it softens the paint chemically and then as it dries it tries to bind both sides of the cracked paint together, this process alone doesn't address the problem that caused the paint peel. If it was moisture related then you need to fix the moisture problem first.
    Little about a lot and a lot about a little.
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    HayZee518's Avatar
    HayZee518 is offline Deity
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    As PUSHKINS and any other paint moderator will tell you, the finish is only as good as what's underneath. The wood HAS to be dry. Zissner's "kilz" outdoor will work, but it too has to be applied to something dry. Paint bubbles up for a reason. Moisture underneath exposed to the sun creates an air pocket, maybe steam and lifts the paint that hasn't bonded with the base.

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    ba_50 is offline Handyman
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    Ok, this paint is indoors on plaster, sheet rock or something similiar. It may have happened when the sump pump quit working and about 2 1/2 feet of water sat in the basement for a month or so, 3 years ago. Or it could have been from a pretty good earthquake this year. Did a lot of damage to other houses around here.

    No way am I taking all the paint off!

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    HayZee518's Avatar
    HayZee518 is offline Deity
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    sheetrock is two pieces of cardboard bonded to a plaster of paris middle which is heated to dry it. plaster is made up of gypsum and sintered limestone with binders. a real sloppy undercoat may release or expand the first layer of cardboard on sheetrock. bare plaster exposed to air and moisture creates hot spots called efflourescence which inhibits the bonding of paint primers. the efflourescence has to be neutralized by a chemical means - tri sodium phosphate is used for that purpose. two feet of standing water in a basement is not good. as the water evaporates it creates humidity in the whole house as it rises and permeates the whole house. mold developes and involves the whole structure. the whole house needs to be dried out or brought to a reasonable moisture content that can be tolerated. pretty tall order if you ask me! wvguy is our paint moderator. perhaps if you send him a private email, he may have the answers you are looking for. - hayzee

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    ba_50 is offline Handyman
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    Hayzee,

    That's interesting about what TSP will do. I thought it was just for cleaning houses.

    It has been 3 summers since the basement had water in it, so it should be dry by now.

    We keep the temperature at 55 degrees all winter. I wonder if that has anything to do with it.

    I'll contact your moderator. Thanks.

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    Allison1888 is offline Handyman
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    peeling paint

    If the paint has an alligator type finish, it's lead, so I would be very careful about where that peeling paint lands. You're better off stripping it with a chemical stripper and starting over -- not a quick job, but worth it in the end.

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