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  1. #1
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    replacing cast iron sewer with plastic

    I am trying to replace some old (perhaps 60 or more years) cast iron sewer line that rns into my basement with plastic. I went to Lowes and they have like 3 different brand and colors of pipes that says "sewer" on them .. they were white, green, and gray in color .. i ended up buying the white one because it was the cheapest ($8 / 10 feet pipe).. here are my questions:


    1- Do the colors mean anything? What type do u recommend?

    2- I have 2 use those black flex rubber coupling that have those screw rings (sorry don't know proper name) in a couple of places .. how tight can i make them? i am afraid that i should have bought the more rigid pipes since i have to use these type of coupling

    3- what is the best way to cut the old cast iron pipe .. i am afraid that it would crack .. specially at the end where it eventually goes under the ground ..

    Thanks for your help and suggestions.

  2. #2
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    By definition the word "Schedule" means a plan for carrying out a process or procedure.

    The ASTM (American Society of Testing & Materials) has published a number of tables defining the standard dimensions for pipe. The individual tables are referred to as SChedules thus we have a broad range of pipe schedules from Sched, 10 through sched. 300. Basically the higher the schedule number the thicker the pipe wall.

    While PVC pipe is made in a number of different schedules for pressure pipe applications for DWV (Drain, waste & vent) applications within a structure we may only use PVC Schedule 40.

    ASTM standards require that all PVC pipe must have the name of the manufacturer, nominal pipe size, pipe schedule, pressure rating for water at 73degF and ASTM designation printed on the pipe wall.

    The ASTM designation 1785 is for pressure pipe and the ASTM designation 2665 is for DWV pipe.

    All PVC schedule 40 pipe will have the dual designation ASTM 1785 & ASTM 2665

    Example:

    Harvel Pipe Co. PVC 1-1/2" sched.40, 330psi @73degF ASTM 1785 & ASTM 2665

    PVC pipe made to Schedule standards is commonly made in White, Gray and clear.

    You will also find a light weight PVC pipe in the hardware that is White, light green or sometimes blue and labelled as SDR 30 or SDR 35. SDR is the ASTM Size Dimension Ratio standard and this pipe may not be used inside a structure. It is used primarily for storm drainage, sewer & septic leachfield lines where permitted by local codes.

    The best method to cut your cast iron pipe is by means of a "Cast Iron Snap Cutter". These are fairly expensive tools and not one that I would recommend a homeowner purchase, but you can rent one from a local tool rental company for about $15 or $20 a day. The snap cutter has a chain that is wrapped around the pipe at the point where you need to cut it, then a crank is turned to pull tension of the chain and you will hear a light snap as the pipe cuts. There are other methods such as a reciprocating saw or a circular saw fitted with abrasive blades but from my experience you will burn up a number of blades before completing a cut and in the end renting a snap cutter will prove to be the most time and cost effective method.

    Be very careful when cutting cast iron pipe. Cast iron is very heavy and in many instances it is not well supported, especially when cutting stacks which are typically self supporting. Before making any cuts check the hangers to be sure the remaining pipe will not fall when you make your cut. When in doubt add additional strap hangers before cutting.

  3. #3
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    thanks LazyPup .. howabout the coupling that i use? Are there diferent types? Also can i use rubber U's and T's ?

    basically this is what i am doing:


    There are 2 iron pipes that come from the bathroom and kitchen area from the upper floor, (one 3" and one 2" and 10 feet apart) into the basement where they feed into a 4 inch cast iron pipe that runs almost parallel to the basement floor (well, it is sloped and 20 feet later runs into the ground).. it is this pipe that needs to be replaced.


    It is easy to put something together that wroks but i want to make sure i follow the standards/code

    Thanks.

  4. #4
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    If you will look in the Home Repair forum-Illustration Library on page 2 you will see a detailed illustrated method of breaking out the cast iron pipe.

    I have worked out the solution for your project and made the attached illustration to help you.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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