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Thread: NexPump sump pump system?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood View Post
    I

    Hopefully from the time the boat springs a leak until you get it out of the water. But if it doesn't boats have flotation built into them and there is always the Coast Guard, SeaTow, and insurance.... .
    Once again, this is a basement sump pump system. It has nothing to do with boats other than that it uses marine bilge pumps. It's basically a backup system that self-tests, and tha CLAIMS to be able to also work as a main system.

    Well, now that I know which pumps they are, (thanks again) I sent a query directly to Rule. Maybe they'll respond.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cableaddict View Post
    Once again, this is a basement sump pump system. It has nothing to do with boats other than that it uses marine bilge pumps. It's basically a backup system that self-tests, and tha CLAIMS to be able to also work as a main system.
    No! It is a bilge pump that is weak on capacity and service life, designed for temporary use in a leaking boat, to hopefully save the boat from swamping or, sinking.

    The slick marketing experts at NexPump rather than design a backup sump pump system that is truly effective and has a long service life have taken the cheap easy way out and are selling a system that has marketing claims that are taller than what they deliver. While it may be nice to have a sump pump system that self tests the battery and pump, then e-mails you telling you that it is working properly and ready to go, these tests have no value other than looking good on a slick website and in their YouTube videos.

    If you rely on this system I highly recommend that you have Flood Insurance Coverage and please realize that this coverage is separate from your homeowners insurance.

    Now as to your stubbornness and persistance in tooting the value of this system, I personally believe that you are not a consumer interested in purchasing the system, but rather someone that has a vested interest in selling this system. Thanks for spamming this forum as part of your marketing effort!
    Last edited by Redwood; 08-28-2011 at 02:50 PM.
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    For those of you reading this thread that have 12-volt back up sump pumps that do not have the "Feel Good" self diagnostic e-mail ability, check this link on how to test a deep cycle battery. It is a simple test procedure that will give you an indication of the batteries ability to deliver its rated capacity and is not a "Feel Good Test."

    DEEP CYCLE BATTERY FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
    I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    Now I can Plumb!

    For great information on the history of sanitary sewers including the use of Redwood Pipe
    Visit http://www.sewerhistory.org/
    Did you know some Redwood Pipe is still in service today.

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    I've had this system for 6 years. It has run with ZERO issues - except it told me to replace the batteries last year.

    Some of you people have missed the boat literally.
    So what do you do when the power goes out? or the pump or float packs it in?
    Call your your insurance agent?

    Me - I decided to avoid all those hassles completely.

    If you are so concerned about the lifespan of Rule pumps, then install a $100 120 volt pump and set the NexPump up as a backup. The inventor shows how to do this on his site.

    And I'd rather not have to go through the hassle of manually performing deep cycle battery testing. I've got better things to do with my life. NexPump checks it twice a day automatically.
    Last edited by NexPumpowner; 08-28-2011 at 11:40 AM.

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    Experiance with Rule pumps

    Quote Originally Posted by Cableaddict View Post
    Wow, Redwood, I think you are correct. That has to be the pump. (Definitely an ITT / Rule.) THANKS !

    My big concern is not GPH @ 10', two of these should be enough for my basement (and I'd have another dual-pump system as the backup) My concern is:

    1: Can these run continuous duty, and last?

    2: Can these really run dry (testing 2x per day) for short amounts of time, without butning up?

    3: Can these sit dry for a year, with no damage to the seals?

    Any idea? I'd really LOVE to install a system that doesn't require PITA testing at a minimum of once a month, although it looks like that will probably be the case.
    I have been using the 120V rule sumps pumps for about 10 years now.
    I do NOT have experiance with their 12V, but my experiance with both 120V and 12V motors in numerous other areas tells me that the 12V should work the same as the 120V assuming they are designed properly and Rule has been making these pumps, particularly the 12V pumps for a long time.
    The Rule sump pumps I have used, test for the presence of water by turning on for only about 1-2 secs and determining the resistance to the impeller. If it is sufficient, it goes into pump mode and pumps out the pit.
    If not, if tries it again about every 5 minutes, every hour of every day and my sump pump has been doing this "dry" for 8+ years.
    So testing dry is not an issue, because you are not running dry, just testing for a few seconds and the seals and bearings are designed for it.
    In fact, you can block an impeller and the unit just detects it and waits for
    you to clear it.
    As far as the system, I know nothing about it personally, but if it is using the Rule pumps, then everything else is just the electronics and the Rule pumps in my experiance have been extremely reliable and draw far less current for their pumping capacity than most other pumps.
    I used the Rules, as when the AC went out, the pumps could run off a std high capacity UPS system.
    Of course, all the rest of the electronics in the NEx system aren't there, and as mine is almost 10 years old now, I am actually looking at getting a Nex system as it is the closest to the system I now have than most.
    I learned in the past the hard way, that even with a backup system, if the pumps are checked, when they suddenly have to work, they may be dead.

    That happened to me so the idea the system checks the pumps and tells me "hopefully" long before that my system is failing, is important to me.

    I have no connection with Nex or (as of yet) no experiance with their system, just the Rule pumps.

    Hope this helps you out.

    Bpstars

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    I would be extremely cautious about buying a pump that doesn't even have a flow chart. All they say in the ITT site is that they do 4000 gph. THat's probably at 0 head or less. Give it 10' of head and water probably won't even make it to the top.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Speedbump For This Useful Post:

    Redwood (08-28-2011)

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bpstars View Post
    I have been using the 120V rule sumps pumps for about 10 years now.
    I do NOT have experiance with their 12V, but my experiance with both 120V and 12V motors in numerous other areas tells me that the 12V should work the same as the 120V assuming they are designed properly and Rule has been making these pumps, particularly the 12V pumps for a long time.
    The Rule sump pumps I have used, test for the presence of water by turning on for only about 1-2 secs and determining the resistance to the impeller. If it is sufficient, it goes into pump mode and pumps out the pit.
    If not, if tries it again about every 5 minutes, every hour of every day and my sump pump has been doing this "dry" for 8+ years.
    So testing dry is not an issue, because you are not running dry, just testing for a few seconds and the seals and bearings are designed for it.
    In fact, you can block an impeller and the unit just detects it and waits for
    you to clear it.
    As far as the system, I know nothing about it personally, but if it is using the Rule pumps, then everything else is just the electronics and the Rule pumps in my experiance have been extremely reliable and draw far less current for their pumping capacity than most other pumps.
    I used the Rules, as when the AC went out, the pumps could run off a std high capacity UPS system.
    Of course, all the rest of the electronics in the NEx system aren't there, and as mine is almost 10 years old now, I am actually looking at getting a Nex system as it is the closest to the system I now have than most.
    I learned in the past the hard way, that even with a backup system, if the pumps are checked, when they suddenly have to work, they may be dead.

    That happened to me so the idea the system checks the pumps and tells me "hopefully" long before that my system is failing, is important to me.

    I have no connection with Nex or (as of yet) no experiance with their system, just the Rule pumps.

    Hope this helps you out.

    Bpstars
    Great Post and highly informative....

    It is also the biggest "Crock O Crap" I've ever read.

    Rule does not make 120-volt Sump Pumps...

    Rule does make 12-volt DC Bilge Pumps!
    I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    Now I can Plumb!

    For great information on the history of sanitary sewers including the use of Redwood Pipe
    Visit http://www.sewerhistory.org/
    Did you know some Redwood Pipe is still in service today.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedbump View Post
    I would be extremely cautious about buying a pump that doesn't even have a flow chart. All they say in the ITT site is that they do 4000 gph. THat's probably at 0 head or less. Give it 10' of head and water probably won't even make it to the top.
    How right you are!

    The flow is rated on a horizontal flow on bilge pumps all they have to do is get the water above the water line of the boat and shut off head pressure is of no concern....

    It looks like NexPump has sent the Sybil Attack Force in now as the one post wonders are storming the gates....

    I wonder if they sell salt-free water softeners as well....



    Quote Originally Posted by NexPumpowner View Post
    I've had this system for 6 years. It has run with ZERO issues - except it told me to replace the batteries last year.

    Some of you people have missed the boat literally.
    So what do you do when the power goes out? or the pump or float packs it in?
    Call your your insurance agent?

    Me - I decided to avoid all those hassles completely.

    If you are so concerned about the lifespan of Rule pumps, then install a $100 120 volt pump and set the NexPump up as a backup. The inventor shows how to do this on his site.

    And I'd rather not have to go through the hassle of manually performing deep cycle battery testing. I've got better things to do with my life. NexPump checks it twice a day automatically.
    No, we recommend the use of a real 120-volt main pump and the use of a real 12-volt back up pump such as the Zoeller Aquanot II. The expected service life of the Rule 4000 Bilge Pump is 2500 hours per the manufacturer.

    I'd like to see the AI Control Box do the specific gravity test which is recognized as the only test for deep cycle battery capacity testing....

    Can't be done by wire yet to the best of my knowledge....

    There is no question here who is missing the boat....
    I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    Now I can Plumb!

    For great information on the history of sanitary sewers including the use of Redwood Pipe
    Visit http://www.sewerhistory.org/
    Did you know some Redwood Pipe is still in service today.

  10. #19
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    Try a little learning

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood View Post
    How right you are!

    The flow is rated on a horizontal flow on bilge pumps all they have to do is get the water above the water line of the boat and shut off head pressure is of no concern....

    It looks like NexPump has sent the Sybil Attack Force in now as the one post wonders are storming the gates....

    I wonder if they sell salt-free water softeners as well....





    No, we recommend the use of a real 120-volt main pump and the use of a real 12-volt back up pump such as the Zoeller Aquanot II. The expected service life of the Rule 4000 Bilge Pump is 2500 hours per the manufacturer.

    I'd like to see the AI Control Box do the specific gravity test which is recognized as the only test for deep cycle battery capacity testing....

    Can't be done by wire yet to the best of my knowledge....

    There is no question here who is missing the boat....
    It would be nice if you had a clue what you where talking about rather than just spouting off.
    Its not real hard to find out, just go to the ITT web site, click on the Rule Icon and when the page comes up, simply go to sumbersible pumps and click on the icon that says 110V.
    Amazingly, 3 pumps come up, all for general utility use including sumps.
    They only make the model 1800 now, the model 2800 (which I am still using BTW) which was rated at 2800 gph is now discontinued, however the 1800 gph model is still made and has been made for over 1o years.
    I don't mind anyone disagreeing or giving their opinion, but if you are going to be impolite, at least know what your talking about.

  11. #20
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    Rule pumps

    Just to avoid any more confusion, the model 1800 was originally the 3rd in a utility pump line that went to the 2800 and the 4000, all 110V.

    The major difference besides capacity, was that the 2800 and 4000 came with std 1 1/2" fittings for easy connections to existing sump systems where the small model (1800) did not.

    And as to pumping 10ft, the model 2800 at 110V, and a head of 9.5ft, managed to keep pumping out my sump thru the 7" of rain we just got from Irene over the last 12-18 hrs.

    I agree knowing the flow at the std 10ft ht is important , but even at Rules site, they only list the pumps gph at 0 ft (always have) and my 2800 lists the capacity at other head hts only in the installation manual where they have a chart.

    As to the Nex system, it is tested on YouTube and like 75% of the pumps tested, seem to pump about 50-60% of their rated capacity when pumping to 10 ft. It is up to a buyer to determine if that would be sufficient for their needs or worth the price.

    As to testing the battery, there are a large number of higher end chargers that all perform basic battery testing and charging. They don't claim anything more than that they do the same.

    Personally, I agree that they stretch their feature list to the limit, but that is not uncommon with most manufacturers and at least I have not found that they are claiming anything that they do not or cannot do.

    IMO, their system is a reasonable option that depending on what you need from a sump/backup system, could be a good option.

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