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Thread: How Many Gallons Per Foot?

  1. #21
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    SDR 11 means that the outside diameter of the pipe is eleven times the thickness of the wall.

    So since polybutylene is SDR-11 measure the OD then divide by 11 to get the thickness of the wall of the tubing...

    Then take the od and subtract (2 times the wall thickness) to get the ID...

    I'd love to say I remember the ID but the last time I used the stuff was in 1986... Oh well it wasn't important enough to remember...

    Out of curiosity what do the fittings look like?
    There was a class action on that stuff and some fittings were worse than others....
    http://polybutylenelawsuit.com/
    Last edited by Redwood; 12-18-2011 at 08:08 PM.
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  2. #22
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    The polybutylene pipe reacted poorly with chlorinated water...
    that's not a problem here.
    However, major civil lawsuits in large populations with highly-chlorinated city water
    brought production of that pipe material to the end...
    The other thing was the crimps degrading and failing with brass fittings...
    The pipes sprunk leaks anywhere from 7 to 15 years in those areas.

    These pipes here are 25 years old and haven't leaked yet until
    one sectional floor slab froze during a month long January power outage about 8 years ago.
    End of that slab.
    Up here in the northern tier of New York state, it's much more rural
    and drilled well water is the norm - no chlorine.
    It's pretty much the same deal in other rural areas of north america as well.
    Well water won't hurt polybutylene and was common for ground-source heating systems.

    There's not much difficulty finding the proper adaptive fittings between polybutylene piping-to-Pex, or poly-to-copper pipes up here, but I'm sure it's harder to find in areas where poly wasn't used.
    Last edited by Stayouttadabunker; 12-18-2011 at 10:01 PM.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stayouttadabunker View Post
    The other thing was the crimps degrading and failing with brass fittings...
    Acetal fittings were another problem area...
    I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
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    For great information on the history of sanitary sewers including the use of Redwood Pipe
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    Did you know some Redwood Pipe is still in service today.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DuneMe View Post
    Pipe comparison . . .
    www(dot)acehardware.com/info/index.jsp?categoryId=1267591

    Looks like the walls on copper pipe is 1/8"???

    Maybe, but we're talking about polybutylene SDR-11 pipes from the mid-80's...

  5. #25
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    brass, yes, copper no. all they make is type L and type M copper tubing.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by DuneMe View Post
    I would think the wall would be about the same as brass/copper???
    Well Polybutylene does have the same OD as copper as it is a CTS (Copper Tube Size) pipe...

    So the OD is 7/8" or .875" for Types K, L, & M...
    The wall thickness varies with the type with K being the thickest and M being the thinnest... K is used for underground service lines...

    Figure your Polybutylene ID using the information in my earlier post...
    I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    Now I can Plumb!

    For great information on the history of sanitary sewers including the use of Redwood Pipe
    Visit http://www.sewerhistory.org/
    Did you know some Redwood Pipe is still in service today.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by DuneMe View Post
    Sorry, just giving all I can as far as information.

    I would think the wall would be about the same as brass/copper???
    I wish I had a piece to measure with a set of calipers but while the nominal names (for ex. 1/2", 3/4",1", etc.) of these pipes are alike the O.D. and I.D's are quite different.

    If the O.D. of a piece of 3/4" copper pipe
    and a piece of 3/4" polybutylene are the same O.D. -
    I would offhand guess that the I.D. of the PB pipe would be smaller
    and the walls thicker than copper?
    The only way to know for sure is to get samples of these differing pipes,
    measure them or get a specification sheet on them.

    For some reason, I am having difficulty finding specs anywhere on the internet on polybutylene pipes.
    I believe the because the companies stopped making them, documentation
    about precise specifications on them is rather scarce.
    Right now, we are just guessing...
    Last edited by Stayouttadabunker; 12-20-2011 at 10:27 AM.

  8. #28
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    Read posts 22 & 32 and you'll have your answers...
    I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    Now I can Plumb!

    For great information on the history of sanitary sewers including the use of Redwood Pipe
    Visit http://www.sewerhistory.org/
    Did you know some Redwood Pipe is still in service today.

  9. #29
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    Nope! That has nothing to do with SDR-11 Polybutylene Tubing...

    This does though...
    Read posts 22 & 32 and you'll have your answers...


    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood Post 22 View Post
    SDR 11 means that the outside diameter of the pipe is eleven times the thickness of the wall.

    So since polybutylene is SDR-11 measure the OD then divide by 11 to get the thickness of the wall of the tubing...

    Then take the od and subtract (2 times the wall thickness) to get the ID...
    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood Post 32 View Post
    Well Polybutylene does have the same OD as copper as it is a CTS (Copper Tube Size) pipe...

    So the OD is 7/8" or .875" for Types K, L, & M...
    The wall thickness varies with the type with K being the thickest and M being the thinnest... K is used for underground service lines...

    Figure your Polybutylene ID using the information in my earlier post...
    Last edited by Redwood; 12-22-2011 at 09:53 AM.
    I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    Now I can Plumb!

    For great information on the history of sanitary sewers including the use of Redwood Pipe
    Visit http://www.sewerhistory.org/
    Did you know some Redwood Pipe is still in service today.

  10. #30
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    Stay Outta the bunker - why are the tubing dimensions so critical that you need to know? Can you not just trust the trade size dimensions and go with that? It isn't a science to fill the slab manifold with water and glycol. just keep pouring it in until its filled. You don't know how the tubes are placed in the slab unless you have the engineering data of the guy that built the place and even with that, how do you know the contractor didn't cut corners in installing the mat?

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