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Thread: Tile flooring to replace carpet

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    Tile flooring to replace carpet

    My home has a crawl space, hence the sub floor is either plywood or OSB. Considering removing carpet from my living room and installing the wood grain ceramic tile. I realize it will be a cold floor, but we like rugs. Any problem doing this and what do you think about the way it will look? Any tips? I'm a home repair novice... do you recommend getting an "expert" to do this?

    The other option would be regular hard wood flooring. I am not a fan of laminate flooring. Looks good, but get water on it and it is pretty much ruined with raised edges along joining pieces.

    Thanks for your opinions.

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    with tile you will need a sub floor that will not flex under any circumstances. tiles will pop off. grout will come out of joints,
    regular flooring would be best as it would flex with the loading of it. laminate might but essentially it is floatinjg on the sub floor.

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    I agree with HayZee, the sub flooring if paramount to any good tile installation. If the subfloor is sturdy then you apply a layer of thinset with a 1/4" notched trowel then immediately install cement backer board (screw it down DO NOT let anyone convince you to just nail it down) once it is dry (24 hours) you can proceed in tiling.
    The backer board will give a moderate amount of latitude to "flex" or climatic changes as it will move with the tile and visa versa. (wood and tile/cement expand and contract very differently throughout the year).
    A small trick is to lay out ALL the backer board in the room before you start the initial thinset application to the existing subfloor, that way all your cuts are premade and you can lift up one sheet at a time and apply thinset and screw it down then move onto the next sheet.
    Another tip, when you have removed all the carpet and ALL the staples, screw down the existing subfloor to the floor joists. (if it was initially nailed also make sure all nails are hammered home).
    There are many screws to be applied to each sheet of backer board so it might be easier on your back and hands if you hire/rent a subflooring screw gun.
    Little about a lot and a lot about a little.
    Every day is a learning day.

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    Thanks. I am going to talk to some tile guys about it too. I don't want to go to the expense of doing it only to see the tiles lifting up over time. I am still debating the ceramic tile choice in general.

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