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Thread: Must read material for the diy

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    Must read material for the diy

    Gotta read this!
    Woman ends up in sticky situation, finally comes unglued
    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH EVERYDAY SUNDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2004

    (This classic Dave Barry column was originally published on Dec. 2, 2000.)


    Today’s topic for homeowners is: How to install a tile floor.

    Any home decorator will tell you that there is nothing quite like a tile floor for transforming an ordinary room into an ordinary room that has tile on the floor.

    But if you’re like most homeowners, you think that laying tile is a job for the “pros.” Boy, are you ever stupid! Because the truth is that anybody can do it! All it takes is a little planning, the right materials, and a Fire Rescue unit.

    Consider the true story of a woman in Linthicum, Md., who decided to tile her kitchen floor, as reported in the Annapolis, Md., Capital. According to this article, sent in by many alert readers, the woman, who wanted to be identified only as “Anne” for reasons that will become clear, decided to surprise her fiancé by tiling her kitchen floor herself, thus saving the $700 a so-called “expert” would have charged for the job.

    Step One, of course, was for Anne to spread powerful glue on the floor so that the tiles would be bonded firmly in place. Anne then proceeded to Step Two, which – as you have probably already guessed – was to slip and fall face-first into the glue coat she created in Step One, thus bonding herself to the floor like a gum wad on a hot sidewalk.

    Fortunately, Anne was not alone. Also in the house, thank goodness, was one of the most useful companions a person can ever hope to have: a small dog.

    Specifically, it was a Yorkshire terrier, a breed originally developed in England to serve as make-up applicators. A full-grown “Yorkie” is about the size of a standard walnut, although it has more hair and a smaller brain.

    Anne’s dog, named Cleopatra, saw that her owner was in trouble, so she immediately ran outside and summoned a police officer.

    Ha ha! No, seriously, Cleopatra did what all dogs do when their owners are in trouble: lick the owner’s face. Dogs believe this is the correct response to every emergency. If Lassie had been a real dog, when little Timmy was sinking in the quicksand, Lassie, instead of racing back to the farmhouse to get help, would have helpfully licked Timmy on the face until he disappeared, at which point Lassie, having done all she could for him, would have resumed licking herself.

    So anyway, when Cleopatra decided to help out, she naturally also became stuck in the glue. But again, luck was on Anne’s side, because also at home were her two daughters, ages 9 and 10, who, realizing that the situation was no joking matter, immediately, in the words of the Capital article, “began laughing hysterically.”

    Eventually, with their help, Anne got unstuck from the floor and was able to lay the tile. But she still had glue all over herself. So, according to the Capital article, “she called a glue emergency hot line, but no one answered.”

    I don’t know about you, but that sentence disturbs me. I think somebody should check on the glue-emergency hot-line staff. I picture an office reeking of glue fumes, with shacked-out workers permanently bonded to floors, walls ceilings, each other, etc. Come to think of it, this is also how I picture Congress.

    But getting back to Anne: Still trying to solve her personal glue problem, she called a tile contractor. During this conversation, the glue on her body hardened, such that (1) her right foot became stuck to the floor, (2) her legs became stuck together, (3) her body became stuck to a chair, and (4) her hand became stuck to the phone.

    “I had to dial 911 with my nose,” she is quoted as saying.

    When the rescue personnel arrived, they found Anne still stuck. Perhaps this is a good time in our story to bring up the fact that she had been working in, and was still wearing, only her underwear. Fortunately, the rescue crews were serious, competent, highly trained professionals, and thus, to again quote the Capital article, they “laughed until they cried.”

    Once they recovered, the rescue crews were able to free Anne by following the standard procedure for this type of situation: licking her face.

    No, seriously, they freed her with solvents, and everything was fine. Anne got her new floor and saved herself $700, which I am sure more than makes up for suffering enough humiliation to last four or five lifetimes.

    So the bottom line, homeowners, is this: Don’t be afraid to tackle that tile job! Just be sure to have a dog handy, and always remember the No. 1 rule of tile-installation professionals: Wear clean underwear.



    Too funny!

    Floorman
    floorlayers union local 1310

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    Good read, Floorman! That brought to mind an incident that occured quite a few years ago in one of the Michigan suburbs. A lady and her kids wanted to remove the in/outdoor carpet from the kitchen. After pulling up the carpet, there was still the adhesive residue left. I believe they used GASOLINE to take up the residue and , of coarse, it exploded even though the kitchen window was open. Serious injuries did result from that. Nothing funny in this one, but it's amazing the stories about floor coverings......

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    Nothing funny in this one either but what Mrcaptainbob was saying about gasoline being used in "not so well ventilated" areas reminds me of what happened a block from my house a few years back. Turns out a homeowner decided he was going to cart his snowblower down his basement to do a little work on it. No big deal, I mean he only has a big GARAGE but whatever. Anyway he gets this heap down into the basement and starts to perform whatever work needed to be done on it, too bad it involved the fuel system on it and well, the atmosphere around him became heavy with gasoline vapour. Too bad the "atmosphere" happened to contain the furnace and water heater , as well as the standing pilot(s) within. Need I say more? Just for the record, the person involved wasnt injured bad as far as I know, but the inside of his house had to be gutted from the damage from smoke and fire, there wasnt much of an explosion if any..


    A.D

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    Yes , you are absolutely right. This is a CLASSIC.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rewired View Post
    Nothing funny in this one either but what Mrcaptainbob was saying about gasoline being used in "not so well ventilated" areas reminds me of what happened a block from my house a few years back. Turns out a homeowner decided he was going to cart his snowblower down his basement to do a little work on it. No big deal, I mean he only has a big GARAGE but whatever. Anyway he gets this heap down into the basement and starts to perform whatever work needed to be done on it, too bad it involved the fuel system on it and well, the atmosphere around him became heavy with gasoline vapour. Too bad the "atmosphere" happened to contain the furnace and water heater , as well as the standing pilot(s) within. Need I say more? Just for the record, the person involved wasnt injured bad as far as I know, but the inside of his house had to be gutted from the damage from smoke and fire, there wasnt much of an explosion if any..


    A.D
    My water heater actually has a little graphic diagram printed on it that warns about that exact situation, but it's on the bottom of the tank and is not very big--

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    Roaring remodeling trash fire

    Speaking of bonfires:
    Our Stupid former neighbors now in jail for grand theft auto when they parked their stolen car on the street.
    They did a lousy job of house remodeling and had alot of extra 2x4's and other trash in a huge pile next to their lawn equipment in yard.
    One night about 10pm they dumped several cans of gasoline on the pile.
    Whooosh. The flame were over 20' and embers and ash were flying everywhere on other homes and including on our boat tarp with a boat that had 100 gal. of gas in it. I called Fire dept. and they put out the roaring blaze and the Sheriff killed the booze party.
    The fine for that blaze was $1000

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    It always give me a big laugh whenever I'm done reading it again and again..

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    Nice story, very funny!

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    My father in law and I had our difficulties with laying tile in my kitchen floor. The biggest issue we had was some of the damage left by some of the old appliances leftover when we moved in. Ends up the fan at the bottom of the old, clunky refrigerator had charred a nice, big portion of the old tile, all the way down to the floorboards in the kitchen. We had a good time repairing that by ourselves! But I think this poor woman's experience takes the cake for kitchen horror stories. Glad to hear that everything turned out ok for both her and her little dog.
    Last edited by toastixeoh; 05-06-2011 at 10:15 PM.

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