Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Basement floor drains

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hazleton, PA, USA.
    Posts
    150
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Basement floor drains

    I have a few basement floor drains that I believe need to be capped for code reasons. What is the best way to cap them? Do they make caps to place on them or is there another way? They are surrounded by a little indention so all the water flows into them.
    Jtfoxman

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    512
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 57 Times in 56 Posts
    I would question the reasoning behind capping them...
    I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    Now I can Plumb!

    For great information on the history of sanitary sewers including the use of Redwood Pipe
    Visit http://www.sewerhistory.org/
    Did you know some Redwood Pipe is still in service today.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hazleton, PA, USA.
    Posts
    150
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    When I purchased the house the inspector said that they should be capped. Not sure of the reasoninf behind it though. Hopefully someoe on the boards know.
    Jtfoxman

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Saint Regis Falls, NY, USA.
    Posts
    8,705
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 478 Times in 465 Posts
    probably the reason is that they are part of your effluent drain. a backup of the drain would cause sewage to come up. the floor drains have no traps

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hazleton, PA, USA.
    Posts
    150
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    So what is the best way to cap them. I have 2 that are in the floor both with screening over them. And I have 1 that used to be a toilet drain that is uncovered due to no toilet.

    Forgot to add that the floor is concrete and the cast iron drain pipes are flush with the top of the concrete floor.
    Last edited by jtfoxman; 05-20-2009 at 03:38 PM.
    Jtfoxman

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Saint Regis Falls, NY, USA.
    Posts
    8,705
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 478 Times in 465 Posts
    I went to another screen and searched for drain plugs and didn't find much. I would suggest a chunk of oak log tapered to fit the drain and hammered in tightly. there was one blog that had a plumber install a rubber plug but the thing dissolved after two weeks. wood expands when exposed to water. another way - "rube goldberg" plug use screening then oakum with a plug from hydraulic cement. hydraulic cement expands on curing - regular cement shrinks.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hazleton, PA, USA.
    Posts
    150
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Wow! The plug dissolved, that's amazing. I think I'll try the local DIY store then if not I'll try to find some logs.

    Thanks.
    Jtfoxman

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    512
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 57 Times in 56 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by HayZee518 View Post
    probably the reason is that they are part of your effluent drain. a backup of the drain would cause sewage to come up. the floor drains have no traps
    If they are part of the sanitary sewer system they better have traps.
    They also should have trap primers...

    The home inspector?

    I'm still questioning the need to cap them...
    I question the credibility of most home inspectors...
    Does this basement ever have a water problem?
    Where does the water heater T&P drain go to?
    Condensate Drain for A/C?
    Last edited by Redwood; 05-20-2009 at 08:00 PM.
    I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
    Now I can Plumb!

    For great information on the history of sanitary sewers including the use of Redwood Pipe
    Visit http://www.sewerhistory.org/
    Did you know some Redwood Pipe is still in service today.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hazleton, PA, USA.
    Posts
    150
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Basement has a water problem on occassion. It has to rain a lot or have a large snow melt off. Couple times a year in certain areas. Not flooding maybe an inch in one part of the basement that houses the washer and dryer and an old bathroom with no fixtures.

    Water heater drain just drains onto the floor near a floor drain, all sloped towards the drain.

    No A/C drain
    Jtfoxman

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re :Basement floor drains

    Rain and ground water go to a sump pump, your floor drain should go to your sanitary sewer by either gravity or by a pump. the water holding in the floor drain is normal , a floor drain is trapped under the floor and hold s water so you don't get sewer gas in the house. The elvation of water in the trap doesn't have to be the same as your neighbor,
    it all depends on the depth of the sewer under your floor,

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •