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Thread: How to cover bad drywall job/repairs?

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    renovator bear is offline New Member
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    How to cover bad drywall job/repairs?

    We're in the middle of a basement remodel, and the ceiling, which was drywalled by the previous owner, has several bad joints and repairs. I'd like to avoid ripping it all down, and am wondering if it is possible to add a layer of something else over these bad seams?

    For instance, I think I once saw something on TV about rolling on a water thinned coat of drywall mud and then dragging a stiff paint brush over it when it begins to set to get a "textured" look.

    Has anyone tried this or can offer other suggestions?

    Thank you!

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    asprentz is offline New Member
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    I'd like to know this too. I'm currently taking off 5 layers of wallpaper in my kitchen. The first layer was put right on top of bare drywall and it's paper thin. The adhesive on the first layer is very gummy, kinda like putting a sticker on a piece of paper. I have dents, scratches and even huge gouges in the drywall from this. If you find out what this stuff is, I sure would be interested.

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    HayZee518 is offline Deity
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    If the ceiling "rock" was fastened directly to the joists there's not much you can do other than re-tape the joints. If they installed furring strips to the joists then the rock, again you're at the mercy of the previous owner. They didn't shim in or out the dips and valleys and maybe the furring strips are loose.
    If the joint tape is coming off the joints, maybe you can pull it off and re-tape and mud the joints and feather out from the joint.
    There's an additive in powder form you can add to the latex ceiling paint to give it a popcorn type finish. Use a extra heavy nap roller and roll it on the surface. Roll it on in every direction over the ceiling.
    They even make a spray paint that'll repair popcorn type finishes.

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    LazyPup is offline Deity
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    There is a technique which is often used by sheetrock finishers to produce a customed textured ceiling inwhich the ceiling is first coated with a layer of wet drywall mud (additional water is mixed into the mud to soften its consistency)

    The drywall mud is then applied with a flat trowel to form a buildup coat about 1/8 to 1/4" thich.

    Then they use a variety of different flat trowels, brushes or even stiff house brooms to form random spackles, swirls or zigzag textures.

    In the hands of a skilled professional the end results look fantastic, but take my word of personal experience, it is an art that comes with lots and lots of practice.

    I have tried it in a couple small, out of the way rooms in rental property, and I am not embarrassed by the results, but I would certainly leave a more prominent area of the home to an expert until i had a chance to get a lot more practice.

    You can find the brushes in paint stores or in most of the big box home supplies in the section with drywall tools. I have illustraed a couple of the brushes and the suggested patterns.


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